“Dark Woods” by Mean Mary, from the album “Cold”

As you all know Mean Mary is up at the top of our favorite artists, you might not know she has a new album out in October and is busy on the next one with a Band!

Enjoy this video.  Dark Woods is on Mean Mary’s upcoming album, Cold. Pre-order now at https://meanmary.com/cold

 

Mary must be really really good because my boy loves her and his taste is impeccable when it comes to music, not so good when it comes to women. 

“Talking Reality Television Blues” by Todd Snider, from the album “Cash Cabin Sessions, Vol. 3”

Recording in the late Johnny Cash’s mancave, Snider slings wit, targets hypocrisy, interrogates the blues, and sees ghosts, with Amanda Shires and Jason Isbell assisting.

 Punchlines fly from the get-go (there’s no Vol. 1 or 2), with humanity the usual butt of the jokes, though Trump’s a target, too. Take “Talking Reality Television Blues,” a tribute to Dylan.

“On the Water” by Josh Ritter, from the album “Fever Breaks”

 

The notion of being drawn to another is also present in the nimbly fingerpicked, steel and piano accompanied On The Water (“I’m drawn to you., honey, like the sea to the fisherman’s daughter”), although this time the attraction is more positive (“I’ll be around it don’t matter what the others offer”), reaching out a helping hand when “you’re in-between nothing but thin air and the unknown”, although the object of affection has to make the choice.

“Gotta Get Up” by Tomato/Tomato, from the album “Canary in a Coal Mine”

Four hundred fifty miles of hard Nebraska dirt 
Where the earth and sky embrace and the clouds do all the work. 
I’m running to the mountains, gonna hide out in the hills. 
I’m sick of politicians and the walls their lies have built. 

I miss those Sunday mornings of my early childhood. 
Where we learned to love each other and charity was good. 
Now they’re preaching fear and hate, ’cause love won’t fill the seats. 
So I’m looking for salvation above ten thousand feet. 

Gotta get up – above the crowd. 
It’s wild and it’s savage, I’m not taking any chances. 
Gotta get up – before I drown. 
Gotta get up ’cause I feel it coming down. 

It feels like there’s a reckoning brewing in the clouds. 
If forty days of rain should come, we’ll all need higher ground. 
Don’t look for me in Kansas, don’t look in Tennessee. 
I’ll be in the Rocky Mountains, praying on my knees. 

Gotta get up – above the crowd. 
It’s wild and it’s savage, I’m not taking any chances. 
Gotta get up – before I drown. 
Gotta get up ’cause I feel it coming down. 

I was naive to think that bigotry was frozen in the past. 
A display in some museum, safe behind the glass. 
But it’s alive and it is strong, and it’s marching in the streets. 
How n we tell our children, now it’s theirs….now it’s theirs to defeat? 

Gotta get up – above the crowd. 
It’s wild and it’s savage, I’m not taking any chances. 
Gotta get up – before I drown. 
Gotta get up ’cause I feel it coming down. 

Gotta get up – above the crowd. 
It’s wild and it’s savage, I’m not taking any chances. 
Gotta get up – before I drown. 
Gotta get up ’cause I feel it coming down.

credits

from Canary in a Coal Mine, released March 1, 2019 
John McLaggan- Vocals, Guitar 
Lisa McLaggan- Vocals, Percussion 
Jon Estes- Bass, Piano, Organ 
Jeremy Fetzer- Guitars 
Jon Radford- Drums 
Spencer Cullum- Lap Steel 
Kris Karlsson- Banjoca

“Adobe Road” by Cej, from the album “Adobe Road”

Today the album Adobe Road starts its month as our Spotlight album. Here is the title track and it is a beaut. my son says fantastic, many other listeners have raved about the track and the album.

 

“Gonna Be Leaving” by Abigail Lapell, from the album “Getaway”

Call it prairie noir, or Canadiana desert rock: Abigail Lapell sings haunting, gorgeous modern folk songs, mapping epic natural landscapes and deeply intimate, personal territory.

“Gonna Be Leaving” echoes with the irony of someone who threatens to leave yet never goes—and the certainty that, sooner or later, every relationship will end.

“This is one of my favourite tunes on the album, and one of the most fun to play live,” says Lapell. “The song started as a guitar part that I couldn’t get out of my head, this insistent line that keeps circling back on itself, doubled by the vocals in a sing-song rhyme all about the contradictions of couplehood: the push and pull of independence versus commitment, trying to make it work even against the odds, or trying to leave and not being able to.

At the heart of these anxieties, to me, is the idea of impermanence in any relationship (one way or another, one partner will ultimately be the first to exit). I recently got engaged, so these themes have been on my mind! I love how the band builds on that simple, recurring melodic idea with a heartbeat rhythm section, tiptoeing piano, and overlapping harmonies that rise to a halting finale, rich with ambivalence.”

 

 

 

Said it in the evening, said it in the afternoon, said I’m gonna be leaving 
Gonna be leaving soon, gonna be leaving 
Gonna be leaving soon, and the odds are even 
You’re gonna be leaving, gonna be leaving 
You’re gonna be leaving too 

You’re the poison in the IV / rattlin the sabre, said it wouldn’t be, 
Wouldn’t be easy / said it isn’t gonna be fair, 
Are you gonna get angry? Gonna get even? 
Are you gonna be leaving? 
Gonna be moving on, are you gonna be, gonna be gone 

[Odds are even] You’re gonna be leaving, the odds are even 
Odds are even, you’re gonna be, gonna be gone 
You’re gonna be moving on 

And the odds are even / odds are even 
You’re gonna be leaving, gonna be leaving 
Gonna be leaving soon…. 
Said it in the evening, said it in the afternoon

“Only Words” by Shadowfields, from the album “Festival For One”

Shadowfields (Humphrey-McKeown) is the singer/songwriter partnership of New York native Heather Humphrey and Chicagoan Tom McKeown. They combine organic instrumentation and progressive arrangements to create a folk-rock, Americana sound that is like no other.

 

“Fold Of Your Dress” by Rod Picott, from the album Tell The Truth & Shame The Devil.

 

Final track off the album has yet another haunted track. “Fold Of Your Dress” has Picott seeking out ways to disappear: “Pills make me rattle and cocaine’s worse/Whiskey is a slower ride to the hearse.” But it’s the connection he’s missing that haunts him the most: “Did I set you free just like I did the rest/Wish I was in the fold of your dress.” This is what Picott calls one of the “lighter” songs on the record. Clearly, the man’s been through some stuff.  ( Americana Highways provided the words )

 

 

One hell of an album that has got the reviewers raving with big words and phrases  “Anyone who’s gotten near or past 50 years old knows the existential ruminations that invariably ensue” 

Sorry but I’m over 60 and still feel like 18 and think like a 16 year old. Does that mean its a great album?

I think its  GREAT ALBUM and Mr. Picott does not like writing silly, glittery Pop.

The album is on regular play on TMEfm Radio and was provided by Adam Dawson who can promote great artists if not that famous.