Cahoots – Philosophy

Album Notes
We play our own blend of “Sonomacana” — bluesy, grassy, folky and danceable Sonoma County roots music. From originals and Americana classics to country blues and rockabilly. Named after The Band’s fourth album, Cahoots features prolific songwriter Dan Imhoff, multi-instrumentalist, Craig Anderson, comic ukulele wielding Andy Dru Rodgers, standup bassist, Andy Tester, and percussionist, Eric Backman.

In late summer of 2017, Cahoots retreated to a house in the hills of Mendocino County not far from a town called Philo. We hauled carloads of instruments up a dirt road to a house two miles from the nearest power lines. In the quiet hills we laid down live tracks on eleven songs that were later embellished with our band’s signature country gospel harmonies bolstered by the celestial singing of fellow Sonoma County artist, Alison Harris.

“Philosophy” is the result of that weekend’s dawn to midnight live sessions, along with subsequent months of careful tinkering. The gifted engineer Matt Wright recorded and mixed the songs which were later mastered by Jeffrey Norman at Mockingbird in Petaluma. From start to finish this was a 100 percent Sonoma grown creative endeavor.

John Campbelljohn – Double Down Blues

A master slide blues guitarist and songwriter, John Campbelljohn hails from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada. Over the course of his four decade-long career, John has won or been nominated for countless music awards including Maple Blues Awards, East Coast Music Awards, Real Blues Awards, Music Nova Scotia Entertainer Of The Year, Blues Recording Of The Year & Musician Of The Year.

Now John combines the intimate stylings of his slide-blues solo performances with the hard driving, electric blues-rock rhythms of his band, to create John Campbelljohn DOUBLE DOWN BLUES. John   s long time music partner Neil Robertson adds drums, percussion and harmony vocals. This is an award winning power duo format, established by such groups as The White Stripes, The Black Keys and the legendary slide and steel guitarist David Lindley (Jackson Browne, Ry Cooder).

John Campbelljohn   s sophisticated and progressive approach to songwriting gives him a distinctive edge, mixing rock, blues, reggae, and even celtic-blues into his signature style. The result is a sound that can pummel the audience into submission with blues power one minute, while soothing them with subtle National steel the next.

Pony Creek – Pott County

Pony Creek, a musical collaboration between Ryan Osbahr and Billie Frost, was formed in the spring of 2016.  Hailing from the Omaha/Council Bluffs metro, the name “Pony Creek” is derived from a small creek by the same name that runs between the duo’s homes.

In May of 2016, along with a full band consisting of Eric Nelson (guitar), Travis Goddard (guitar, banjo, mandolin), George Cooper (bass), and Tim Blair (drums), Pony Creek released their debut album Easy Way Out to critical acclaim in the Midwest.  The album was nominated for “Album of the Year” by the Omaha Entertainment and Arts Awards and Pony Creek was nominated for “Best Country” artist by the same institution in 2016 and 2017.  For the past two summers, Pony Creek have become regulars in the Okoboji, Iowa music scene, consistently performing in front of sold out crowds.

Playing a variety of folk, blues, Americana, country and rock, Pony Creek has quickly made a name for themselves as one of the region’s hottest new acts.  Whether playing Spencer, Iowa’s Wheels Up festival for RAGBRAI 2017, Manning Main Street RAGBRAI 2018 festival, or rocking the crowd for southwest Iowa’s Tri City BBQ Fest in Denison, Pony Creek delivers family friendly entertainment that connects with all ages.  Opening for national artists such as Jeremy McComb (Nashville), The Voice alumni Curtis Grimes (Texas), Jason Eady (Jackson, MS), Jon Langston (Nashville), and Tucker Beathard (Nashville), the band continues to gain popularity in the Midwest region.

In September of 2018, Pony Creek released its follow up album entitled Pott County, a 15 track country/rock album that draws influences from Dwight Yoakam to Kacey Musgraves.  Pott County is a mash-up of storytelling that includes small town life, heartbreak, happiness, love, family, addiction, revenge, and more.  It was recorded in Omaha, Nebraska at ARC Studios and mastered by Lurssen Mastering, a world-renowned multi-Grammy Award winning mastering studio.  Pony Creek’s music can be found on AMI Jukeboxes nationwide.

Dede Wyland – Urge For Going

Dede Wyland’s voice rings like a bell, clear and powerful. With a stellar backing band, Dede is showcased here in familiar and supportive ground. Her voice flows and dances through these songs like a luminous golden ribbon.

Album Notes
Dede Wyland’s voice rings like a bell, clear and powerful. With a stellar backing band, Dede is showcased here in familiar and supportive ground. Her voice flows and dances through these songs like a luminous golden ribbon, tying each tying each song together while shining light onto the lyrics. She moves with ease from the haunting country-soul delivery of “Could You Love Me One ore Time” to the precise and masterful control of “Cannonball Yodel.”

I first heard Dede sing with Tony Trischka and Skyline in the ‘80s and I was immediately struck with the richness and strength of her voice. I was also struck with the absolute ease with which she sang. Her singing, then and now, appears effortless and natural, as if she is lounging on a cushy sofa, having a conversation, drink in hand, and suddenly breaks into song. Like falling off a log, as they say where I’m from, like falling off a log. She is doing what she was meant to do and I’m so very glad she is. “Urge for Going” is set to mark Dede Wyland’s rightful place in the history of modern bluegrass.

Missy Raines – Missy Raines and the New Hip
Reflecting on Dede Wyland puts a smile upon my face. I was introduced to her golden tones around the time I first immersed myself in bluegrass, in the early 1980s, while hosting radio shows at WAMU in DC. The band was Tony Trischka and Skyline, a New York/New Jersey-based group that revolutionized our music with their modern approach, not afraid to stretch the music to its bountiful limits. Dede’s voice led the way, soaring and dipping through the textured sounds. But her career in the music goes back even a little further. The Milwaukee-area band ‘Grass, Food and Lodging was around in the late ‘70s, and Dede cut her teeth with that group. In more recent years, Dede has stepped back from the spotlight a little, teaching voice, but still making music around the area where she is now based, near Washington, DC. For this fine new project, she calls on an amazing lineup of DC-based musicians, a list that reminds us just how incredibly strong the music scene is around here still to this day. Add to those local players a few out-of-towners, including Laurie Lewis, Kathy Kallick, and Raymond McLain. From the opening track, a revved-up rendition of the splendid Joni Mitchel song of wanderlust, “Urge for Going,” to the closing track, an old Suzy Bogguss song, “Music on the Wind,” and within the eight great songs between, there’s lots to love. After more than forty years of lighting up the room with her exquisite vocal talents, it’s great to have yet another gem of an album to add to the Dede Wyland discography.

Lee Michael Dempsey – Longtime radio host at WAMU radio and bluegrasscountry.org

Dede Wyland is one of the pioneering women in bluegrass. It’s a fact not discussed as often as it should be, partly because of Dede’s choice these days to perform primarily in the D.C. area where she lives, and concentrate on another passion of hers: passing on her keen knowledge of the human voice in her role as a much sought-after vocal coach.

Those who know Dede as I do are well aware of her immense gift as a singer and stylist capable of tremendous stylistic range. Although she has performed and recorded country, rockabilly, and other genres, bluegrass has always been the foundation of what Dede does, and this record is a statement to that. It’s bluegrass music, extremely well-played by a who’s who of D.C. area pickers: members of the Seldom Scene, Dirty Kitchen, and others, but it’s Dede’s captivating voice and musical leadership that put the artistic stamp on this collection of songs.

Whether it’s the Everly Brothers’ “Let it Be Me,” a Joni Mitchell song, or one by her beloved Stanley Brothers, Dede has the gift of truly delivering the lyrics and making us feel each song in a new way. That’s what an artist does, and Dede has never sounded better doing it.

Chris Jones – Chris Jones & The Night Drivers

The King James Boys – Time To Go Home

The King James Boys are an all gospel, bluegrass band that blends southern gospel harmonies with modern bluegrass sounds. After much encouragement and prayer, The King James Boys were led to pursue ministering and singing abroad. The King James Boys are still doing what they started out doing and that is sharing the gospel with others through the music!

Stryker Brothers – Burn Band

There’s a mythical, fraternal pair known only as the Stryker Brothers whose ghostly chords and verses have haunted the desolate Texas prairies for decades. There isn’t much known about the brothers. No legal records of the two exist. It was only a year ago that a set of original, reel-to-reel tapes were discovered. Those who had come across the Stryker Brother’s music before the tapes were discovered were rumored to be transfixed by what they’d heard… drawn in like moth to flame. Entranced.

Many drove for days into the barren Texas landscape to feel closer to the Strykers’ ghostly serenade, some never to return. So, what happened to the brothers? Did they really perish in a prison fire? Did they go into hiding? Are they ghosts, earth-bound, playing for eternity under a lonely Texas sky? Perhaps we’ll never know, but it is said that during the hottest Texas summer nights — if you listen carefully — you can hear their intoxicating melodies playing amid the moonlit shadows on those desolate desert plains.

Jimmy Aldridge & Sid Goldsmith – Many a Thousand

The release of their critically acclaimed second album ‘Night Hours’ in 2016 cemented Jimmy Aldridge and Sid Goldsmith’s reputation as two of the most exciting musicians and social commentators on the British folk scene. Songs have always taken centre stage with Jimmy and Sid and on ‘Many A Thousand’ we see the duo flexing not only their vocal and instrumentation skills, but also their talent as composers. Part of what makes this compelling duo tick is a love of traditional folksong and a mutual passion for the history that is carried in the music.

On ‘Many A Thousand’ the past and present sit side by side, with original songs more than comfortably holding their own next to the traditional. Another crucial element to this partnership is a shared world-view ? sustainability, traditional crafts and living in tune with the land ? all elements that deeply inform their music.