Larry Peninsula – Country Music Only

No matter age, gender, region of origin, country of origin, religion, social status, sexual preference, or anything else, everyone has the right to make country music if it’s something that dwells with passion in their heart. Authenticity is not just about who you are, or where you’re from. Sure these things are positive attributes in country music, if you were born and raised in the South or Texas, or did your time on a farm or ranch for example. But the true measure of authenticity is how true an artist is to themselves.

Often the ranks of traditional country artists are populated by people who feel like prisoners to their time, out-of-place in the modern context, or enslaved by their native geography. They just don’t seem to fit quite right in their world. But in the realm of country music, everything feels familiar. It’s astounding how far this country music passion can travel, and in the case of Larry Peninsula, it made its way to to Scandinavia, and Peninsula’s home country of Finland where he’s been obsessing over everything tied to traditional country music and the American West for many years.

Working tirelessly in his home studio for over three years, Peninsula has finally revealed his debut album Country Music Only. As the name implies, this is no close approximation of American country music. Sure, maybe the foreign accent finds its way through in some of the annunciations, and some use of idiom and language doesn’t translate exactly like it does in country music served in the genre’s native tongue. But what does shine through in stark brilliance is the passion for country music Peninsula and his players exhibit, the studious attention to detail and authentic modes they craft into these songs, and frankly just the overall appeal for the music, regardless of the country of origin.

What you’re first astounded by when you cue up the opening title track is how incredibly tasteful the guitar tones come blazing out at you. With all due respect to the North American outfits out there blazing old school country, only a few select folks like Marty Stuart and “Cousin” Kenny Vaughan could match the skill displayed just in the first 20 seconds of the first song. Larry Peninsula went all out to make sure this record was respectful to the sounds and modes of country music from the start, and it doesn’t let up until the end. This is what Saving Country Music first heard months back, placing “Country Music Only” on the Top 25 Playlist when the song was first released.

Luckily though, this album’s riches don’t stop there. The second song “Just A Moment In Time” is probably the most contemporary track on the record, and may trip some traditionalists up with the first listen. But it’s also probably one of the best written songs on the record. There are a few songs that are very country, like “Country Music Only” and “Pretty Good Crowd,” but the songwriting is kind of pedestrian. But that is not the case with tracks like “Wastin’ Daylight,” which might be the best effort on the record, or “Cowboy Heart” where Larry Peninsula speaks very directly to being a foreigner stung by the country music bug.

Throughout this record, you get a sense of loneliness many traditional country music artists and their fans feel in the modern context. “Where The Rain Is Green” is about dreaming of a place where things make more sense than in the world you’re in, and almost hoping beyond hope to make contact with it. And Peninsula isn’t just inspired by the country, he’s also inspired by Western, which evidences itself in the songs “Dead Renegade” and “I’d Rather Die With My Boots On.” And not to leave his Finnish fans in the lurch, and in a bid to be true to himself, the album ends with him singing and playing a country song in his native language.

The musicians who performed on this record also deserve kudos, including Henry B. Jones on bass guitar, Ilkka Jolma on pedal steel guitar, and Heikki Honkanen on harmonica. But Larry Peninsula played all of the guitars and drums on the record himself, which is astounding since the guitar work is one of the principle assets of it.

It should be the desire of every country music fan to break down whatever barriers persist in people’s hearts and minds, and let the best and most talented artists rise to the top regardless of who they are, or where they’re from. In a just world, an artist like Larry Peninsula and an album like Country Music Only would be reaching everyone with a love of country music in their hearts. Sure, some stuff is lost in the translation. But what is astounding is what is accomplished despite the language barriers and borders separating Larry Peninsula from the origin spot of country music. His passion and guitar work blazes through, and his songwriting holds up in any language.

Country music won’t be bordered, and Larry Peninsula is living proof.

Dosca – Meridian

“Dosca are taking the party up a few notches!”
– Folk Radio UK

“Just Incredible”
– STV
 Glasgow

“Unmistakable musical talent”
-TRADtv

“One of Scotland’s most promising young acts”
– Orkney Folk Festival

” The recently-formed Dosca, comprising five RCS students from both the folk and jazz programmes, were on positively bangin’ form. ”
– Celtic Connections 

 

Morrison Kincannon – Beneath The Redwoods

Spacetalk is proud to reveal its most exciting release to date: a collection of long-lost recordings from forgotten Californian duo Morrison Kincannon, rescued from the dusty tape archives of the pair’s lead songwriter, Norman Morrison…

With only a handful of sought-after private press 7” singles to their name, Morrison Kincannon are all but unknown outside record collecting circles. Yet Norman Morrison and Terry Kincannon wrote and recorded some superb songs during the 1970s and early ‘80s, desperately hoping for the break that would see them released on vinyl. Now, at last, their time has finally come. Morrison and Kincannon first started working together as teenagers almost 50 years ago. Every Saturday, they would get together to jam and write songs. This led to recording sessions at a friendly studio in San Francisco and a management and publishing deal with Manny Greenhill, a man who had previously nurtured the careers of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Sadly, their hoped-for-success never came, and by the early 1980s both members had re-focused on work and family. As the years rolled by, their original multi-track recordings lay idle in Morrison’s loft, seemingly never to be released.

All that changed when Morrison received an email from Spacetalk Records two years ago, asking about the possibility of reissuing “To See One Eagle Fly”, the B-side to one of their 7” singles that has long been a favourite of label co-founder Danny McLewin. Once a deal had been done, Morrison mentioned that he had hours of unissued recordings in his loft; a treasure trove of ultra-rare multi-track master tapes that could be freshly mixed and mastered for release. When the Spacetalk Records’ team finally got a chance to listen, they were astonished by the timeless quality of the songs. Put simply, they just had to be released.

The resultant album is a stunning set: an intoxicating glimpse into the world of two previously unheralded master songwriters whose musical vision encapsulates all that was good about Californian music during the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Rooted in the American folk revival and folk-rock movement of the late ‘60s, the album’s 15 thoughtful, heartfelt songs are laden with sly nods to the likes of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Ned Doheny, Michael Deacon, Cy Timmons, Gene Clark and Buffalo Springfield. The tracks were recorded at various times between 1970 and ’82 and gives a small glimpse of the duo’s total body of unissued work. The release comes with extensive liner notes telling the remarkable story of two lifelong friends and musical collaborators who thought their moment had passed.

Richelle Sigrist – Eyes Of A Stranger

Much anticipated debut album from one of Oklahoma’s top up and coming female artists.

Album Notes
Influenced by James Taylor, Ray Charles, and Bonnie Raitt, Richelle’s original music is lyrically driven with various blends of classic rock, soul, blues and pop.

Sara Morgan – Average Jane

Biography

Sara Morgan is a performing singer/songwriter quickly making her name known throughout the Midwest and beyond. Sara’s sound is refreshingly different with a slight soulful hint of blues mingled with an undeniable, yet very identifiable country twang. Her voice has been called “a blend of Norah Jones, Jewel, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, Reba McIntyre, and Patty Lovelace” – all of whom are musical influences.

Sara truly enjoys performing for audiences, but she is most content and “at home” when she is writing and composing her own original material; her songwriting catalog reaches across multiple genres. Sara writes and composes an eclectic mix of songs ranging from folk, Americana, bluegrass, and country, to rock, pop, R&B, Broadway, and contemporary Christian. Her versatility as a songwriter is as undeniable as her unique vocal sound.

Sara sells out listening rooms, is a crowd favorite at song swaps and songwriter showcases, and is often asked to assist other songwriters with their work.

Sara has opened for multi-Grammy and Dove award winner BJ Thomas, country superstar John Michael Montgomery, singer-songwriter Michael Martin Murphey, Sex and the City heart throb John Corbett, alternative folk singer-songwriter Sean Rowe, and singer-songwriter Ben Taylor. She was also the preshow act at the Industry Bar inside the Uptown Theater in Kansas City before her idol, Loretta Lynn, took the main stage.

Sara has appeared on WDAF Fox TV, KCTV 5, KTHB, KCTP, and she has performed the National Anthem for the Missouri Mavericks, Sporting KC, and the Kansas City Royals; her songs get radio play on community radio station KKFI 90.1 FM, and 90.9 The Bridge in Kansas City, and KMXN 92.9 “The Bull” in Lawrence, KS; she has been featured in the Kansas City Star, Deli Magazine, Ink Magazine, and The Pitch news publications, and she records at Chapman Studios in Lenexa, Kansas. Sara resides in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Ricky Cook – Thanks A Lot Loretta!

If you’re lookin’ for country, you came to the right place… #authenticcountry.

Ricky along with his good friend, writing partner and producer J.P. Pennington is laying out his heart and soul on his first CD, Thanks A Lot Loretta. This is the kind of music that true country music lovers have been anticipating for quite some time. Not only has he brought back authentic country music but he pays tribute to his longtime idol, Loretta Lynn whose cassette tape was the first he ever bought, ‘Just a Woman’. I thought she was a knock-out right then and there. I really fell in love after seeing her perform with Conway Twitty in my very first concert in Knoxville, Tennessee. I think when she hears my music, she’ll be just a little bit proud… after all I’m just a coal miner’s son.