Jeremy Parsons – Things I Need To Say

“Things I Need To Say” has Jeremy Parsons embark on a great journey, with a tender folk style informing the entirety of the album. Details matter a great detail from the tenderness of the fiddle to the reassuring vocals that grace every track. Best of all the entire album comes together as a great story, with each song yet another chapter. Lyrics emphasize the daunting demands that life often requires in order to truly excel. Opting for such a style the colorful rush of melody and rhythm further adds to the soothing nature.  Stylistically the pieces are rooted in folk, with elements of chamber pop, country, rock, and even the blues coming into a singular whole.

 

On “Makin’ Things Up As I Go” Jeremy Parsons starts the album on a high note, as the light sunny sound goes for a celebratory spirit. Much more introspective in nature is the gentle” Life”. A distinctly western twang with fine slide guitar frames the powerful “Circumstance”. Blues informs the swinging “Purpose”. Slowing things down into a languid pace the contemplative “Lisa’s Lost” goes through the sad events that unfortunately can take a prominent place in a person’s life. Light flourishes work wonders on the dreamy “After All These Years”. With an autumnal flavor “Things I Need To Say” serves as the highlight of the album, guided with a strong sense of honesty. Nicely bringing the album together is the delicate “Why Is The Bluebird Blue”.

 

Jeremy Parsons crafts an album with a unique vision, one that feels earnest, honest, and so real.

Nev Cottee – Broken Flowers

Made in Manchester, started in Made in Manchester, started in India and finished in Wales. Nev Cottee’s Broken Flowers – A deeply cinematic, string-soaked album rich in atmosphere and brooding ambience.

A Psychedelic rapture, resigned with reflection and widescreen atmospherics amidst tales of heartbreak, melancholy and troubles to come

 

Nev Cottee may hail from Manchester (his former band Proud Mary were the first signing to Noel Gallagher’s Sour Mash label) yet his heart and muse seem firmly attached to some outpost in the southern states of America, and the sun-kissed atmosphere and narcotically-enhanced mellifluousness of ‘Broken Flowers’ will have it taking pride of place in the more enterprising head’s collection. Something akin to a Ry Cooder platter enhanced by the production and arrangement nous of Air’s ‘Virgin Suicides’, ‘Broken Flowers’ is a thing of lazy majesty indeed.